On June 27, 2017, the Cyberspace Administration of China (CAC) released its National Cyber Threat Response Plan to help bolster its cyber security posture.  According to news sources citing a document posted on the CAC website, the Plan includes a four-tier color-coded warning system that ranked the severity of cyber attacks Red (the highest level), Orange, Yellow, or Blue (the lowest level).

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On May 11, the U.S. President’s Executive Order (EO) “Strengthening the Cybersecurity of Federal Networks and Critical Infrastructure” was finally signed.  This long awaited EO comes on the heels of leaked earlier versions throughout the first part of 2017.  Each subsequent leaked iteration – a draft was published by the Washington Post in January, a revision was published by the Lawfare Blog in February, and the most comprehensive iteration was leaked in early May and also published by the Lawfare Blog.

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UK’s Digital Strategy – Future Model or Another Thought Piece?

First announced in 2015, the United Kingdom (UK) finally published its Digital Strategy that went into effect on March 1, 2017.  Per the government’s website, the goal of this document is to provide a blueprint how the UK will build on its success to date in developing a world-leading digital economy that works for the greater good.  This is particularly important given that the UK is a global capital for financial technology, which generated £6.6bn of revenue in 2015.

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3 non-technical positions in high demand in the cybersecurity industry

We keep hearing about the widening skills gap ravaging the Cybersecurity industry. Lack of qualified personnel is slowing its growth and affecting the security level of the customers. But most people outside the industry see these statistics and shrug. The cybersecurity industry is perceived as a very small, elitist segment of the tech market. Even to point of it being a niche industry.

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Tallinn 2.0 May Be More Useful Than Its Predecessor

In early February 2017, Tallinn Manual 2.0 was published by Cambridge University Press.  Led by the NATO Cooperative Cyber Defence Centre of Excellence, publication of the initial Tallinn Manual occurred in 2013 and focused on the applicability of international law to conventional state-authorized and operated cyber warfare.  Authored by a group of international law experts, the recent follow-up focuses on a full spectrum of international law as applicable to cyber operations conducted by and directed against nation states, ranging from peacetime legal regimes to the law of armed conflict.

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RSAC 2017- more of the same, but some interesting trends emerge

RSAC 2017 is behind us. It has been bigger, noisier and more crowded than any cybersecurity event in history. It’s so big, it’s overwhelming. And if you consider the off-site meetings, mini-conferences, meetups and parties you can forgive an average visitor if he or she feels kind of fuzzy afterward. Vendors don’t have it easy, either. With more than 700 companies and organizations presenting, trying to stand out or simply gauge the competition is extremely difficult.

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The Cyber Coordinator: Let the Dog Bite

Former New York Mayor Rudy Giuliani has been tapped to be the President’s new “cyber security czar.”  The appointment has been met with trepidation among those in the information security business who point out Mr. Giuliani’s lack of expertise in anything cyber-related, despite being Chair of the Cybersecurity, Privacy and Crisis Management Practice at a Miami-based law firm and advising companies on information security since 2002.  In fact, critics cite recent reporting revealing that passwords used by Giuliani and 13 other top staff members have been leaked in mass breaches of websites like LinkedIn, MySpace, and others between 2012 and 2016.

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Israeli cybersecurity industry- looking back at 2016

Israel is a major force in cybersecurity innovation and development, and Israeli cybersecurity companies are at the forefront of technology, rubbing shoulders with global industry giants. In fact, according to CyberDB data-bank, Israel has the second largest amount of cybersecurity companies in the world, second only to the US. In terms of actual sales Israel cybersecurity exports account for anything between 5-10% of the global cybersecurity market , an amazing figure given Israel’s miniscule size and small population.

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